Niaspan

DRUG DESCRIPTION

NIASPAN (niacin tablet, film-coated extended-release), contains niacin, which at therapeutic doses is an antihyperlipidemic agent. Niacin (nicotinic acid, or 3-pyridinecarboxylic acid) is a white, crystalline powder, very soluble in water, with the following structural formula:

NIASPAN®
  (niacin) Structural Formula Illustration

NIASPAN (niacin) is an unscored, medium-orange, film-coated tablet for oral administration and is available in three tablet strengths containing 500, 750, and 1000 mg niacin. NIASPAN (niacin) tablets also contain the inactive ingredients hypromellose, povidone, stearic acid, and polyethylene glycol, and the following coloring agents: FD&C yellow #6/sunset yellow FCF Aluminum Lake, synthetic red and yellow iron oxides, and titanium dioxide.

What are the possible side effects of niacin ?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • feeling light-headed, fainting;
  • fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • swelling;
  • jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes); or
  • muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness with fever or flu symptoms and dark colored...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Niaspan »

What are the precautions when taking niacin (Niaspan)?

Before taking niacin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This product should not be used if you have certain medical problems. Before using this product, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: very low blood pressure, current liver disease, increase in liver enzymes, current ulcer, current bleeding.

If you have any of the following health problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist before starting this product: alcohol use, history of bleeding problems (e.g., low platelets), diabetes, gallbladder disease, glaucoma, gout, heart disease (e.g., recent heart attack,...

Read All Potential Precautions of Niaspan »


Niaspan Consumer (continued)

SIDE EFFECTS: Flushing/warmth in the face and neck, headache, itching, burning, sweating, chills, or tingling may occur within 20 minutes to 4 hours of taking this medication. Flushing may persist for a few hours. These effects should improve or go away as your body adjusts to the medication.

Stomach upset, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may also occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, contact your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

If your doctor has prescribed this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: severe dizziness/fainting, fast/irregular heartbeat, severe headache (migraine), unusual joint pain, swelling of legs/arms, vision problems.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: severe stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools, easy bruising/bleeding, unexplained muscle pain/tenderness/weakness, persistent nausea/vomiting, change in the amount of urine, dark urine, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, yellowing eyes/skin.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, persistent itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking niacin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This product should not be used if you have certain medical problems. Before using this product, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: very low blood pressure, current liver disease, increase in liver enzymes, current ulcer, current bleeding.

If you have any of the following health problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist before starting this product: alcohol use, history of bleeding problems (e.g., low platelets), diabetes, gallbladder disease, glaucoma, gout, heart disease (e.g., recent heart attack, unstable angina), kidney disease, history of liver disease, untreated mineral imbalance (low phosphate levels), history of stomach/intestinal ulcers, underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism).

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

To minimize dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position. This is very important if you are also taking medication to lower your blood pressure.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking this medication.

If you have diabetes, this drug may increase your blood sugar levels. Check your blood sugar levels regularly as directed by your doctor. Tell your doctor immediately if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst and urination. Your anti-diabetic medication or diet may need to be adjusted. Ask your doctor.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

This medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.


Niaspan Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: B-3-50, B3-500-Gr, Niacin SR, Niacor, Niaspan ER, Slo-Niacin

Generic Name: niacin (nicotinic acid) (Pronunciation: NYE a sin (NIK oh TIN ik AS id))

  • What is niacin (Niaspan)?
  • What are the possible side effects of niacin ?
  • What is the most important information I should know about niacin?
  • What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking niacin ?
  • How should I take niacin ?
  • What happens if I miss a dose?
  • What happens if I overdose?
  • What should I avoid while taking niacin ?
  • What other drugs will affect niacin ?
  • Where can I get more information?

What is niacin (Niaspan)?

Niacin, also called nicotinic acid, is a B vitamin (vitamin B3). It occurs naturally in plants and animals, and is also added to many foods as a vitamin supplement. Niacin is also present in many multiple vitamins and nutritional supplements.

Niacin is used to treat and prevent a lack of natural niacin in the body, and to lower cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) in the blood. It is also used to lower the risk of heart attack in people with high cholesterol who have already had a heart attack. Niacin is sometimes used to treat coronary artery disease (also called atherosclerosis).

Niacin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of niacin ?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • feeling light-headed, fainting;
  • fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • swelling;
  • jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes); or
  • muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness with fever or flu symptoms and dark colored urine.

If you are diabetic, tell your doctor about any changes in your blood sugar levels.

Less serious side effects of niacin include:

  • mild dizziness;
  • warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;
  • itching, dry skin;
  • sweating or chills;
  • nausea, diarrhea, belching, gas;
  • muscle pain, leg cramps; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about niacin?

Do not take this medication if you are allergic to niacin, or if you have severe liver disease, a stomach ulcer, or active bleeding.

Niacin can cause certain side effects, such as flushing (warmth, itching, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin). These effects can be made worse if you drink alcohol or hot beverages shortly after you take niacin. These effects should disappear over time as you keep taking the medication.

Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.

Avoid taking colestipol (Colestid) or cholestyramine (Locholest, Prevalite, Questran) at the same time you take niacin. If you take either of these other medications, take them at least 4 to 6 hours before or after you take niacin.

Niacin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Related Drug Centers
  • Niaspan
  • Niacor


Related Drugs Index: